• U.N.’S ‘CREDIBILITY AT RISK’ WITH ONE-SIDED YEMEN REPORTS

    JEDDAH, Saudi Arabia, The UN is rapidly losing its credibility because of what experts say are its one-sided and questionable reports on the situation in Yemen. “The problem is simple: The Houthis form only two to three percent of the Yemeni population, and yet these Iranian-supported militias are holding the entire country hostage at the […]

  • CHOLERA DEATH TOLL RISES TO 2,151 IN WAR-TORN YEMEN: W.H.O.

    SANAA, Yemen, The death toll of the Cholera epidemic in war-ravaged Yemen has risen to 2,151, since it broke out in late Apr, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said. A total of 800,626 people from 22 provinces, out of a total of 23, have been infected, WHO said in a statement. The death toll has […]

  • Somali Forces Shoot and Kill Iranian Sailor in Indian Ocean

    Somali regional officials say the Iranian captain of a fishing boat was killed and another sailor was injured after security forces opened fire during an operation in the Indian Ocean. Officials said the shooting occurred after Puntland Maritime Police Forces spotted two boats suspected to be fishing illegally Friday in Somali waters. Colonel Mohamed Abdi […]

  • Thousands of Migrants Found Trapped Amid Libya Fighting

    CAIRO Thousands of migrants have been found trapped in camps in Libya the past days after they were caught amid the fighting over the northwestern city of Sabratha, officials said Sunday.

    Sabratha, a city on the western side of Libya’s Mediterranean coast that used to be the main launching point for migrant boats, has witnessed heavy clashes over the past two weeks. Hundreds were killed in the fighting and officials said that it was triggered by an Italian deal with one of the rival militias to stem the flow of migrants from Libya across the Mediterranean.

    Over 4,000 migrants, including pregnant women and children, were found in the past two days in different locations in town, said Saleh Graisia, the spokesman for Anti-ISIS Operation Room. The group is now in control of the city of Sabratha.

    Graisia accused the al-Ammu militia � which struck a deal with Italy and Libya to stop trafficking � of storing the migrants to smuggle them later. It wasn’t immediately possible to reach al-Ammu for comment.

    Essam Karrar, the head of the Sabratha Civil Society Federation, said 1,700 migrants were found at the western edge of Sabratha, which used to be under control of al-Ammu, while the rest were scattered elsewhere. He said al-Ammu intended to deport the migrants.

    The city is now “healing its wounds” after the fighting shattered families and brothers raised guns against each other.

    “We the people in Sabratha were only tools in the hands of Europeans,”‘ he said.

    The deal with Italy led to a dramatic drop in migration from Sabratha but some in Libya feared the salaries and supplies would enrich the militias and make them more powerful. The boost to one side threw off the balance of power in Sabratha, triggering a backlash from other local militias.

    Source: Voice of America

  • Suspected US Drone Strike Kills 5 al-Qaida Fighters in Yemen

    SANA’A Yemeni tribal leaders say a suspected U.S. drone strike has killed five alleged al-Qaida fighters in the country’s central Marib province.They say the men were traveling Sunday in the Saud area of Rawan district when a missile hit their car, en…

  • DRC Lawmakers: Militants Ambush, Kill Travelers in Northeast

    GOMA, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO Militants ambushed a group of about 30 civilians in northeastern Congo and killed many of them before fighting a fierce battle with the army, politicians said on Sunday.The attack took place near the city of Beni and…

  • DRC Lawmakers: Militants Ambush, Kill Travelers in Northeast

    GOMA, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO Militants ambushed a group of about 30 civilians in northeastern Congo and killed many of them before fighting a fierce battle with the army, politicians said on Sunday.The attack took place near the city of Beni and…

  • UN chief urges global solidarity, accelerated climate action after visit to hurricane-stricken Barbuda

    Having seen first-hand the destruction wrought by the recent hurricanes in the Caribbean, United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres on Saturday called for the full mobilization of the international community to support the people of the affected areas, while stressing the need to accelerate climate action.

    I have just witnessed a level of devastation that I have never seen in my life, Mr. Guterres told a press conference following a visit to storm-battered Barbuda.

    I have been in areas torn by conflict. In my own country, I have seen earthquakes, I’ve seen storms [] I have never seen such a high-level of devastation like the one that I witnessed in Barbuda, he stated.

    This must make us think seriously, added Mr. Guterres, who arrived today for a two-day visit to Antigua, Barbuda and Dominica to survey the damage and to assess what more the UN can do to help people recover from the back-to-back, category 5 hurricanes that struck the region recently.

    I have just witnessed a level of devastation that I have never seen in my life

    The Secretary-General cited a clear link between the level of greenhouse gas in the atmosphere, including CO2, the temperature of the water and the intensity of the rainstorms and of the different hurricanes in the region and in other parts of the world.

    Hurricane Irma, which struck the region in early September, had winds of 300 km per hour for 37 hours � the longest such period ever recorded.

    So the link between climate change and the devastation we are witnessing is clear, and there is a collective responsibility of the international community to stop this suicidal development, stated Mr. Guterres.

    And for that, it is essential that the Paris Agreement on climate change is fully endorsed and respected but also to recognize that the commitments made in Paris are not enough, he said.

    Mr. Guterres also stressed the need to mobilize resources, including through innovative financial mechanisms, so that people can rebuild their lives, noting that middle-income countries such as Antigua and Barbuda cannot do it alone.

    This is an obligation of the international community, because they are suffering the effects of climate change but they have not contributed to it.

    In Barbuda, the Secretary-General walked through Codrington town and met with some of the returnees. The island’s 1,600 residents were evacuated to Antigua before Hurricane Irma struck last month. In Antigua, many of the displaced are staying in shelters, while others with family and friends. Some residents have been traveling back to Barbuda to check on their homes and lands.

    Since the disasters struck, the UN and partners have delivered relief by both air and the sea, reaching thousands across the region with food, water purification tablets, water storage tanks, tents, school kits, mosquito nets and cash assistance. They also launched a $113.9 million appeal to cover humanitarian needs for the immediate period ahead. The UN family is also supporting those staying in the shelters.

    Mr. Guterres had a chance to meet with some of the displaced during a visit to the National Technical Training Center in Antigua, which is currently sheltering 112 people, and even got a lesson from some of the younger residents in ‘warri’ � a game that was brought over to the region from Africa and is played with 48 seeds on a rectangular board with 12 receptacles or ‘houses.’

    The most immediate need they have right now is privacy, Samantha Burnette, who manages the shelter at the Training Centre, told UN News. Most of them are complaining that they have been bunking with a lot of people. So they don’t have the space they need.

    Most of the residents have made up their mind to stay out the year in Antigua. Some of them are saying there’s nothing in Barbuda to go back to right now, said Ms. Burnette. They don’t mind going back but after it has been rebuilt. Some of them are willing to go back as it is now. But the majority are here and they don’t want to move and go nowhere. If they do go over, it’s just for the day and they come back.

    Despite the difficulties they have gone through, the residents have adjusted well to their new situation, Ms. Burnette said. I really feel they have adjusted themselves well. You can see they are smiling a little more now.

    Source: UN News Centre

  • UN chief urges global solidarity, accelerated climate action after visit to hurricane-stricken Barbuda

    Having seen first-hand the destruction wrought by the recent hurricanes in the Caribbean, United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres on Saturday called for the full mobilization of the international community to support the people of the affected areas, while stressing the need to accelerate climate action.

    I have just witnessed a level of devastation that I have never seen in my life, Mr. Guterres told a press conference following a visit to storm-battered Barbuda.

    I have been in areas torn by conflict. In my own country, I have seen earthquakes, I’ve seen storms [] I have never seen such a high-level of devastation like the one that I witnessed in Barbuda, he stated.

    This must make us think seriously, added Mr. Guterres, who arrived today for a two-day visit to Antigua, Barbuda and Dominica to survey the damage and to assess what more the UN can do to help people recover from the back-to-back, category 5 hurricanes that struck the region recently.

    I have just witnessed a level of devastation that I have never seen in my life

    The Secretary-General cited a clear link between the level of greenhouse gas in the atmosphere, including CO2, the temperature of the water and the intensity of the rainstorms and of the different hurricanes in the region and in other parts of the world.

    Hurricane Irma, which struck the region in early September, had winds of 300 km per hour for 37 hours � the longest such period ever recorded.

    So the link between climate change and the devastation we are witnessing is clear, and there is a collective responsibility of the international community to stop this suicidal development, stated Mr. Guterres.

    And for that, it is essential that the Paris Agreement on climate change is fully endorsed and respected but also to recognize that the commitments made in Paris are not enough, he said.

    Mr. Guterres also stressed the need to mobilize resources, including through innovative financial mechanisms, so that people can rebuild their lives, noting that middle-income countries such as Antigua and Barbuda cannot do it alone.

    This is an obligation of the international community, because they are suffering the effects of climate change but they have not contributed to it.

    In Barbuda, the Secretary-General walked through Codrington town and met with some of the returnees. The island’s 1,600 residents were evacuated to Antigua before Hurricane Irma struck last month. In Antigua, many of the displaced are staying in shelters, while others with family and friends. Some residents have been traveling back to Barbuda to check on their homes and lands.

    Since the disasters struck, the UN and partners have delivered relief by both air and the sea, reaching thousands across the region with food, water purification tablets, water storage tanks, tents, school kits, mosquito nets and cash assistance. They also launched a $113.9 million appeal to cover humanitarian needs for the immediate period ahead. The UN family is also supporting those staying in the shelters.

    Mr. Guterres had a chance to meet with some of the displaced during a visit to the National Technical Training Center in Antigua, which is currently sheltering 112 people, and even got a lesson from some of the younger residents in ‘warri’ � a game that was brought over to the region from Africa and is played with 48 seeds on a rectangular board with 12 receptacles or ‘houses.’

    The most immediate need they have right now is privacy, Samantha Burnette, who manages the shelter at the Training Centre, told UN News. Most of them are complaining that they have been bunking with a lot of people. So they don’t have the space they need.

    Most of the residents have made up their mind to stay out the year in Antigua. Some of them are saying there’s nothing in Barbuda to go back to right now, said Ms. Burnette. They don’t mind going back but after it has been rebuilt. Some of them are willing to go back as it is now. But the majority are here and they don’t want to move and go nowhere. If they do go over, it’s just for the day and they come back.

    Despite the difficulties they have gone through, the residents have adjusted well to their new situation, Ms. Burnette said. I really feel they have adjusted themselves well. You can see they are smiling a little more now.

    Source: UN News Centre

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