The situation in Yemen will be addressed, as US State Secretary, John Kerry, holds two-day talks on Syria, with foreign ministers of Switzerland and the UK as of Saturday (tomorrow), the State Department said.

"I would say, it's somewhat safe to assume that -- he's (Secretary Kerry) going to raise the situation in Yemen. Because we're very concerned about what's happening there, as well as, what's happening in Syria," deputy spokesperson of the Dept. Mark Toner told a briefing on Thursday.

Since last Saturday, Secretary Kerry has spoken about introducing Yemen to the talks, with Saudi Arabia's Deputy Crown Prince, Second Deputy Premier and Minister of Defence, Prince Mohammed bin Salman bin Abdulaziz, as well as, other officials, added Toner.

These officials include Saudi Arabia's Foreign Minister, Adel Al-Jubeir, UAE Foreign Minister, Sheikh Abdullah bin Zayed Al-Nahyan, British Foreign Secretary, Boris Johnson, Oman's Minister tasked with Foreign Affairs, Yousef bin Alawi and UN Special Envoy for Yemen, Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed, he said.

Earlier on Thursday, the US struck three Ansarullah radar positions in Yemen, for the first time, after two failed missile attacks from these areas had targeted its warships in the Red Sea and Bab Al-Mandab Strait, in the space of four days.

"This is not any engagement in the sectarian situation on the ground in Yemen. This is purely a self-defence measure, taken in response to the missile launches," underlined White House Press Secretary, Eric Schultz, at a press conference on Thursday.

The Pentagon earlier stated that the US would "respond to any further threat to our ships and commercial traffic, as appropriate."

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK.

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