ADEN, Yemen- Delegation of the internationally-recognised Yemeni government, arrived Wednesday, in Geneva, to participate in a new round of talks sponsored by the United Nations, to end a four- year-old military conflict with the Iranian-backed Houthi rebels.

A government official said that, a high-ranking team, led by the country's Foreign Minister, Khaled Yamani, arrived in Switzerland to attend the UN-backed negotiations with the Houthis' team. He confirmed that the delegations, representing the two-warring sides will hold meetings separately, inside closed rooms and won't sit together during the negotiations period.

The official said that, the talks will mainly focus on the humanitarian situation and releasing the prisoners, but political issues regarding the country's crisis and the ongoing civil war will be postponed for unspecified time.

Yemen's presidency is insisting that the release of former President, Ali Abdullah Saleh's body, and other political detainees from the Houthis' custody is a main priority for its negotiating team, according to the official.

Both the Yemeni government and the Iranian-backed Houthis announced the delegates names and confirmed their participation in the next talks, following four rounds of previous talks that failed to reach common ground.

Yemen's Vice President, General Ali Mohsen, affirmed that the government is entering peace talks for the fourth time in good faith, giving precedence to the interest of the Yemeni people over all other considerations. "Yemen's vice president expressed his hope that the Houthi militants will, likewise, give precedence to the interests of the Yemenis, who endured an unprecedented suffering as a result of the Houthi coup in 2014."

A source close to Houthi officials confirmed that, "the issue of the strategic port city of Hodeidah will be included during Thursday's negotiations in Geneva."

Yemenis across the war-torn Arab country remain pessimistic, ahead of the new negotiations, as the country's economy is collapsing and leaving already poor people more destitute.

The Yemeni riyal continued sinking faster and faster in recent days, after nearly four years of deadly military conflict. In the street markets in the southern port city of Aden, where the Saudi-backed government is officially based, one U.S. dollar was traded at 623 riyals, up from 215 riyals, the rate set before the war.

Yemen's President, Abdu-Rabbu Mansour Hadi, chaired an emergency meeting and agreed to raise the salaries of thousands of public-sector employees and pensioners, to reduce the impact of the currency devaluation.

President Hadi ordered the government to take effective and urgent measures to restore the stability of food and services supply, following this week's further devaluation of the riyal against the U.S. dollar and the soar of prices of basic commodities.

But Hadi's decisions and promises apparently failed to cease the mounting anger against the Saudi-backed government, as demonstrations spread to include the south-eastern province of Hadramout. Earlier in the day, demonstrations, demanding economic reforms escalated across the country's southern provinces, controlled by the government, including the port city of Aden for the fourth consecutive day.

Stores, government institutions, banks and universities were shut down as civil disobedience continues to hit Aden, paralysing daily life in the southern main city, where the government is based.

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK

ADEN, Yemen- Delegation of the internationally-recognised Yemeni government, arrived Wednesday, in Geneva, to participate in a new round of talks sponsored by the United Nations, to end a four- year-old military conflict with the Iranian-backed Houthi rebels.

A government official said that, a high-ranking team, led by the country's Foreign Minister, Khaled Yamani, arrived in Switzerland to attend the UN-backed negotiations with the Houthis' team. He confirmed that the delegations, representing the two-warring sides will hold meetings separately, inside closed rooms and won't sit together during the negotiations period.

The official said that, the talks will mainly focus on the humanitarian situation and releasing the prisoners, but political issues regarding the country's crisis and the ongoing civil war will be postponed for unspecified time.

Yemen's presidency is insisting that the release of former President, Ali Abdullah Saleh's body, and other political detainees from the Houthis' custody is a main priority for its negotiating team, according to the official.

Both the Yemeni government and the Iranian-backed Houthis announced the delegates names and confirmed their participation in the next talks, following four rounds of previous talks that failed to reach common ground.

Yemen's Vice President, General Ali Mohsen, affirmed that the government is entering peace talks for the fourth time in good faith, giving precedence to the interest of the Yemeni people over all other considerations. "Yemen's vice president expressed his hope that the Houthi militants will, likewise, give precedence to the interests of the Yemenis, who endured an unprecedented suffering as a result of the Houthi coup in 2014."

A source close to Houthi officials confirmed that, "the issue of the strategic port city of Hodeidah will be included during Thursday's negotiations in Geneva."

Yemenis across the war-torn Arab country remain pessimistic, ahead of the new negotiations, as the country's economy is collapsing and leaving already poor people more destitute.

The Yemeni riyal continued sinking faster and faster in recent days, after nearly four years of deadly military conflict. In the street markets in the southern port city of Aden, where the Saudi-backed government is officially based, one U.S. dollar was traded at 623 riyals, up from 215 riyals, the rate set before the war.

Yemen's President, Abdu-Rabbu Mansour Hadi, chaired an emergency meeting and agreed to raise the salaries of thousands of public-sector employees and pensioners, to reduce the impact of the currency devaluation.

President Hadi ordered the government to take effective and urgent measures to restore the stability of food and services supply, following this week's further devaluation of the riyal against the U.S. dollar and the soar of prices of basic commodities.

But Hadi's decisions and promises apparently failed to cease the mounting anger against the Saudi-backed government, as demonstrations spread to include the south-eastern province of Hadramout. Earlier in the day, demonstrations, demanding economic reforms escalated across the country's southern provinces, controlled by the government, including the port city of Aden for the fourth consecutive day.

Stores, government institutions, banks and universities were shut down as civil disobedience continues to hit Aden, paralysing daily life in the southern main city, where the government is based.

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK

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